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Rikintosh

macrumors regular
Original poster
Apr 22, 2020
152
187
São Paulo, Brazil
powermac colors.png


I was wondering, what would powermacs look like in other flavors? I decided to create this preview.

I think it was complete stupidity to assume that the home market would only want all in ones. PowerMacs for the home audience would have been really cool, maybe it could even have boosted the "gamer" issue, as they were more powerful and versatile.
 

Nermal

Moderator
Staff member
Dec 7, 2002
19,274
1,801
New Zealand
I think it was complete stupidity to assume that the home market would only want all in ones. PowerMacs for the home audience would have been really cool
The $1299 G4 was in my opinion the mythical "xMac" that people talk about. It was fairly cheap, and expandable. I loved mine 🙂 (it was, of course, only available in silver).
 

lepidotós

macrumors regular
Aug 29, 2021
164
168
San Diego, California
They all look pretty good and I wouldn't be disappointed owning any of them, but I think the ones I would have tried for if I was old enough to have gone out to buy one in 2001 would be the white, purple, or orange ones. Graphite is nice, I'd pick it over the flowers or the blues; I don't mind the light blue but it's not as nice to me as the turquoise of the G3 tower.
Although, I would consider the green so I could absolutely spec it out and call it Little Mac.​
 

eyoungren

macrumors Penryn
Aug 31, 2011
24,258
18,416
ten-zero-eleven-zero-zero by zero-two
View attachment 1941787

I was wondering, what would powermacs look like in other flavors? I decided to create this preview.

I think it was complete stupidity to assume that the home market would only want all in ones. PowerMacs for the home audience would have been really cool, maybe it could even have boosted the "gamer" issue, as they were more powerful and versatile.
You have to understand what Apple's market was at that time for the PowerMac. It wasn't the home market. The iMac was targeting the home market. The PowerMac G4 was targeting the business market, specifically design.

In 1999-2000 and on into about 2001-2002 InDesign was not the app it is now. The big layout app was QuarkXPress and to a certain extent Pagemaker. But Quark only made the app for Mac. It wasn't until later versions that they started making it for PC and at that time PC wasn't 'good' enough for design work.

Now around 2001 to 2006, several things started happening. The G5 launched, InDesign got more popular (Adobe sold it to design schools and you could get it commercially for $99), Quark failed to make 5.0 OS X compatible, Apple launched it's 'Get a Mac' campaign and PC's became good at being used for design work.

But during the time period the G4 was sold, color was not a concern to business. Business buys in lots and they don't care what the computer looks like. They care if their employees can use it and they care about cost.

What you have is a really cool concept and is the exact reason that the iMac came in as many colors as it did.
 

joevt

Contributor
Jun 21, 2012
4,337
2,312
This form factor was used 4 times?
https://www.macstories.net/mac/the-power-mac-g4-line/
Blue and White Power Mac G3
Graphite Power Mac G4
QuickSilver Power Mac G4
Mirror Drive Doors Power Mac G4

The first two appear in post #1 or are very similar to those in post #1 (the G3 used translucent plastic, not transparent).
The second two removed the colors and made some other changes to the front and rear.
 
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B S Magnet

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Dec 5, 2018
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View attachment 1941787

I was wondering, what would powermacs look like in other flavors? I decided to create this preview.

I think it was complete stupidity to assume that the home market would only want all in ones. PowerMacs for the home audience would have been really cool, maybe it could even have boosted the "gamer" issue, as they were more powerful and versatile.

In very early 2000, there was a pic floating about, pre-meme-internet, which was never verified to be authentic and was probably a mock-up much like the Photoshop-tinted examples above, but it was a photo of a “grape” G4 tower — possibly a mule inside Cupertino. The photo wasn’t as punchy or as vivid as the mock-up example above, but it was compelling to see nevertheless. The pic hinted at Cupertino possibly trying out prototype moulds with injected plastic colours other than graphite (as the pre-ordered plastic pellets, in production quantities, would have been plentiful and mock-ups happening coincident with the then-current fruit iMac run would not have been difficult). No other colours were shown and, obviously, no grape G4 came to pass as a consumer/prosumer/professional product.

Given the time and timing, the popularity of colour variants in products reached their apex in 1999 and 2000, and there was probably a borderline demand for design — especially industrial design — professionals willing to pay a premium for a colour-customized version of their workstation; purple was just different enough, but not loud enough, to have been entertained by Apple as a special run. Another consideration was this mock-up appeared right when Apple was still struggling to procure enough CPUs from Motorola and IBM to keep up with G4 tower demand.

All of this would have been a few months too late for me, but I’d have scrimped and eaten a lot more kraft dinner and packaged ramen back then to pay the premium for a grape G4 case when I bought mine in late 1999.
 

Rikintosh

macrumors regular
Original poster
Apr 22, 2020
152
187
São Paulo, Brazil
I don't understand why any third-party company has never wanted to develop a kit of plastic parts in other colors for powermac owners. I mean, it's relatively easy for someone to go to a plastic stuff factory, and order a few thousand pieces to be made with injected plastic, at a very low price, abs plastic is cheaper than acrylic.

I remember that at that time, computers like Compaq Presario were sold a lot, which had "color kits", you could change the color of the translucent parts of the desktop, keyboard details, speaker screens. There were also desktop cases that were totally translucent like the imac, others that had panels with translucent parts that you could interchange with other colors.

Even notebooks, like the compaq presario 1400, and Acer travelmate 340, 350 had colorful parts that the user could easily change.
 

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Rikintosh

macrumors regular
Original poster
Apr 22, 2020
152
187
São Paulo, Brazil
In very early 2000, there was a pic floating about, pre-meme-internet, which was never verified to be authentic and was probably a mock-up much like the Photoshop-tinted examples above, but it was a photo of a “grape” G4 tower — possibly a mule inside Cupertino. The photo wasn’t as punchy or as vivid as the mock-up example above, but it was compelling to see nevertheless. The pic hinted at Cupertino possibly trying out prototype moulds with injected plastic colours other than graphite (as the pre-ordered plastic pellets, in production quantities, would have been plentiful and mock-ups happening coincident with the then-current fruit iMac run would not have been difficult). No other colours were shown and, obviously, no grape G4 came to pass as a consumer/prosumer/professional product.

Given the time and timing, the popularity of colour variants in products reached their apex in 1999 and 2000, and there was probably a borderline demand for design — especially industrial design — professionals willing to pay a premium for a colour-customized version of their workstation; purple was just different enough, but not loud enough, to have been entertained by Apple as a special run. Another consideration was this mock-up appeared right when Apple was still struggling to procure enough CPUs from Motorola and IBM to keep up with G4 tower demand.

All of this would have been a few months too late for me, but I’d have scrimped and eaten a lot more kraft dinner and packaged ramen back then to pay the premium for a grape G4 case when I bought mine in late 1999.
It could be a true picture. Apple had several prototype plastic colors and textures for the imac, especially the slot loading revisions. there are pictures on the internet about it, they even made casings in colors we've never seen, like black, yellow, and an imac that instead of having the base casing (the underside) in milky white, had a textured transparent case sandblasted (resembles the apple newton prototype case).

I tried looking for pictures on google but couldn't find them. These were photos in which john ive appeared with other employees, showing these prototypes
 

B S Magnet

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Dec 5, 2018
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Now around 2001 to 2006, several things started happening. The G5 launched, InDesign got more popular (Adobe sold it to design schools and you could get it commercially for $99), Quark failed to make 5.0 OS X compatible, Apple launched it's 'Get a Mac' campaign and PC's became good at being used for design work.

But during the time period the G4 was sold, color was not a concern to business. Business buys in lots and they don't care what the computer looks like. They care if their employees can use it and they care about cost.

A couple of thoughts, one which I may have shared with you before:

I was contracting in a lot of ad agencies and service bureaus in the 1998–2002 window, and I was also kind of a nerd for interesting and notable industrial design. The big name back then was IDEO, and that was a place I aspired to work for someday (that, of course, never came to pass). But one of the things I was constantly paying attention to during those years was the style and design trends in industrial and architectural design, much as one does following the fashion/couture circuit.

There was one particular conversation I have never forgotten, and it was with an unlikely party: an account exec at the agency where I was contracting in October ’01. With an iMac G3 on her desk (I think hers was either lime or graphite, memory is now fuzzy), we were doing what I think a lot of people were doing, especially in the U.S., around that time: wondering how the seismic shake-up of everything just a month prior would detour things going forward.

For this chat, she and I were thinking about the industry in which we worked. She asked me how I thought the shift would disrupt things like product development. This part I can’t forget. It was a late, dark and overcast afternoon. She had an actual office (not a cubicle) with full-pane windows facing out to a major highway just beyond the office buildings. She was sitting at her desk, in front of her iMac. I happened to have my red Handspring Visor Edge with me, probably because we were discussing scheduling.

I replied that the age of organic shapes and colours we’d come to know after about 1996 was dead and over; that industrial design would get more rigid and cold; and colours would become more muted, if not absent altogether. She asked why that was. I remember saying it was because during times of crisis, people become afraid, by instinct, and are less emboldened to experiment outside of their comfort zone. I said, “Stuff like your iMac, or my Visor here, won’t look like that anymore. You’re going to see a lot more muted colours, especially bare metals and colours like grey, white, and black. People are now afraid to look toward optimism and curiosity, and this will bear out with forthcoming industrial design trends.” What I didn’t mention was this would be coincident with an adoption of design ideas borrowed from militarism and military gear. Another thing I didn’t say, but had been on my mind for at least a month, was I’d just witnessed a golden age of design die in real time.

The other thought: the companies buying Power Mac G3s and G4s around this time period were design houses, production studios, and so on, and I’d be remiss if I didn’t note how there are a lot of prima donna archetypes in that rarefied sector. More conventional companies, the kind which buy hundreds or thousands of units in a single purchase order, were outfitting offices, if using Apple, with iMacs. The niche market for a limited edition colour for the graphite G4 was there, but it likely wasn’t enough for a fledgling Apple to rationalize the costs of opening a production line for just that special-coloured case and just for that niche audience who more than had the money to pay for “different” and “exclusive”.

You did, however, see Apple later that same year, dabble in this idea for a lower risk version of this exclusive product strategy: the key lime iBook G3, to its online-only buyers who were willing to pay for it.
 

B S Magnet

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Dec 5, 2018
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I don't understand why any third-party company has never wanted to develop a kit of plastic parts in other colors for powermac owners.

Because Apple would have sued them into oblivion.

SaBl0sr7d61TtCytGxbN9Yb12NCyKOATiuEuM7BBfFY.jpg


Just look at what Apple did to the eMachines eOne in court.


I mean, it's relatively easy for someone to go to a plastic stuff factory, and order a few thousand pieces to be made with injected plastic, at a very low price, abs plastic is cheaper than acrylic.

Cheaper, yes, when not factoring in the per-unit costs of eventual litigation.

I remember that at that time, computers like Compaq Presario were sold a lot, which had "color kits", you could change the color of the translucent parts of the desktop, keyboard details, speaker screens. There were also desktop cases that were totally translucent like the imac, others that had panels with translucent parts that you could interchange with other colors.

Even notebooks, like the compaq presario 1400, and Acer travelmate 340, 350 had colorful parts that the user could easily change.

Having colour wasn’t what Apple’s claim was so much as having those colours used for a particular form factor for product lines which they themselves produced for sale first — and which others would try to emulate. It’s a practice which continues to the present day, but the ability for Apple to sue a claim for, say, a competitor removing a headphone jack off a glass phone after Apple did so first, is probably not worth their time. If anything, they now use this as a tool to shape the industry outcome to their own whims.

The size of a third-party plastic injection moulding company is probably minuscule relative to the might of an Apple, even in 1999 or 2000, and it wouldn’t take much for Apple’s legal team to have bankrupted them quickly. As to 3D printing, however, that’s another matter entirely. But for things like injection moulding, the moulds have to be made and there are pre-production costs involved which raise risk if Apple were to have filed a legal claim against them.

Of course, these days, I’m sure such a company could produce those alternate colour pieces without fear of a lawsuit, if they could rationalize the costs for very slow-moving inventory.
 

Rikintosh

macrumors regular
Original poster
Apr 22, 2020
152
187
São Paulo, Brazil
Because Apple would have sued them into oblivion.

SaBl0sr7d61TtCytGxbN9Yb12NCyKOATiuEuM7BBfFY.jpg


Just look at what Apple did to the eMachines eOne in court.




Cheaper, yes, when not factoring in the per-unit costs of eventual litigation.



Having colour wasn’t what Apple’s claim was so much as having those colours used for a particular form factor for product lines which they themselves produced for sale first — and which others would try to emulate. It’s a practice which continues to the present day, but the ability for Apple to sue a claim for, say, a competitor removing a headphone jack off a glass phone after Apple did so first, is probably not worth their time. If anything, they now use this as a tool to shape the industry outcome to their own whims.

The size of a third-party plastic injection moulding company is probably minuscule relative to the might of an Apple, even in 1999 or 2000, and it wouldn’t take much for Apple’s legal team to have bankrupted them quickly. As to 3D printing, however, that’s another matter entirely. But for things like injection moulding, the moulds have to be made and there are pre-production costs involved which raise risk if Apple were to have filed a legal claim against them.

Of course, these days, I’m sure such a company could produce those alternate colour pieces without fear of a lawsuit, if they could rationalize the costs for very slow-moving inventory.

I don't think legal problems would have stopped anyone. Emachines was a large multinational company, so a process would be viable, but that didn't stop thousands of other Chinese manufacturers from producing keyboards, mice, speakers, cd drives, and computer cases with extremely similar designs. At the launch of the first imac, the fact that it didn't have a floppy drive was controversial, it leveraged part of the industry to produce usb floppy drives, in a case that matched the imac's design. HP and Lexsmark produced printers that also took advantage of the imac design.

Apple tried to seize the term All in One, and sued other all in one computer makers, Daewoo had a horrible, ugly, poorly designed computer that maybe someone with myopia and color blindness could mistake it for an imac.Unlike emachines eone which was actually an imac (or iPC) from the parallel universe.

Apple would have sued manufacturers of colored toilet seats for infringing on the iBook Clamshell's intellectual property, if it weren't so shameful...
 

Rikintosh

macrumors regular
Original poster
Apr 22, 2020
152
187
São Paulo, Brazil
I met a guy from Russia who modified a powerbook g4 17", he took the processor out of a cisco router, I think it was this 7448, and he just replaced the original powerbook processor with this one, without further hardware modifications. So he did something in openfirmware, and managed to reach great speeds. The annoying part of the job is that the processors were soldered directly to the boards, so he had to redo the spheres, but it was not a big problem, as the processor had few connections, and used large spheres.
 

Stevenyo

macrumors member
Oct 2, 2020
41
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View attachment 1941787

I was wondering, what would powermacs look like in other flavors? I decided to create this preview.

I think it was complete stupidity to assume that the home market would only want all in ones. PowerMacs for the home audience would have been really cool, maybe it could even have boosted the "gamer" issue, as they were more powerful and versatile.
I think the negative reaction to the B&W G3 killed the chance for fun "pro" macs forever, sadly. Though the post 9/11 shift mentioned by B S Magnet didn't help! Plus, volumes for G4 towers were likely not high enough to offer a bunch of choices effectively. Even if cheap to make the panels, this was a time where Apple was all about limited SKUs, so complicating the G4 line, which launched with two motherboards, three processor speeds and lots of BTO options with multiple case color options may have been a bridge too far.

I do agree that colors would have been amazing, looking at my Sawtooth and Quicksilver G4 towers, they are boring to look it. But then so is my iMac DV SE, I thought getting graphite was cool and edgy when colors were everywhere, now I wish I had a color even if it was slower at the time. (almost enough to get an M1 imac just for the appearance, but I have no use or space for it)

The original Mac Mini seemed to be the beginning of the end for a cheapish "non-pro" tower for home, sadly. I think we all wish there was a "Mac Mini," "Mac," and "Mac Pro" in the desktop line, but Apple seems to think that "Mac Mini," "grey Mac Mini" HUGE GAP ... Keep waiting .... "Mac Pro" works from them.
 

Amethyst1

macrumors 603
Oct 28, 2015
5,670
6,560
Apple seems to think that "Mac Mini," "grey Mac Mini" HUGE GAP ... Keep waiting .... "Mac Pro" works from them.
Trying to be fair, a maxed out Intel mini (6-core, 64 GB RAM) paired with a beefy eGPU still packs a punch, even if it’s not as “neat” as a tower.
 

Rikintosh

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Apr 22, 2020
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Honestly, in my opinion, Apple has just given a **** the last few years with their designers. First that mac that looks like a garbage can, now this ugly cheese grater mac that looks like a grill grate.

I think Apple peaked with the G5 and mac pro, and after that they threw all their employees out on the street and hired uneducated people to do their designs.

All their products are currently "more of the same", you can take a 2008 macbook and put it next to a 2022, and apart from the slightly darker color and the thinner screen border, they look like the same machine, besides being ugly with that giant touchpad. They turned IBM with their thinkpads that have the same design for 30 years (I think they call it identity, doldrums). I mean, I would have expected outdated stuff and doldrums from the mainstream PC industry, and innovative stuff from Apple even 10 years ago, but nowadays the roles are reversed, and it makes me upset, I believe that even the advantage that M1 has in speed, it will quickly be swallowed up by the amd vs intel race to improve their processors.

In the end, I think Apple felt too comfortable in the position and status it had, and decided that it didn't need to invest more in innovation and smart projects, they thought "our public will be satisfied with more of the same, just like EA FIFA fans"
 
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eyoungren

macrumors Penryn
Aug 31, 2011
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Honestly, in my opinion, Apple has just given a **** the last few years with their designers. First that mac that looks like a garbage can, now this ugly cheese grater mac that looks like a grill grate.

I think Apple peaked with the G5 and mac pro, and after that they threw all their employees out on the street and hired uneducated people to do their designs.

All their products are currently "more of the same", you can take a 2008 macbook and put it next to a 2022, and apart from the slightly darker color and the thinner screen border, they look like the same machine, besides being ugly with that giant touchpad. They turned IBM with their thinkpads that have the same design for 30 years (I think they call it identity, doldrums). I mean, I would have expected outdated stuff and doldrums from the mainstream PC industry, and innovative stuff from Apple even 10 years ago, but nowadays the roles are reversed, and it makes me upset, I believe that even the advantage that M1 has in speed, it will quickly be swallowed up by the amd vs intel race to improve their processors.

In the end, I think Apple felt too comfortable in the position and status it had, and decided that it didn't need to invest more in innovation and smart projects, they thought "our public will be satisfied with more of the same, just like EA FIFA fans"
Your issue is with Jony Ive. He was the sole designer (with other designers assisting him) from about 1998 until a few years ago.

The G5 is his, so is the garbage can MP and the new MP.

The iMac is also his and the G4s.
 
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eyoungren

macrumors Penryn
Aug 31, 2011
24,258
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A couple of thoughts, one which I may have shared with you before:

I was contracting in a lot of ad agencies and service bureaus in the 1998–2002 window, and I was also kind of a nerd for interesting and notable industrial design. The big name back then was IDEO, and that was a place I aspired to work for someday (that, of course, never came to pass). But one of the things I was constantly paying attention to during those years was the style and design trends in industrial and architectural design, much as one does following the fashion/couture circuit.

There was one particular conversation I have never forgotten, and it was with an unlikely party: an account exec at the agency where I was contracting in October ’01. With an iMac G3 on her desk (I think hers was either lime or graphite, memory is now fuzzy), we were doing what I think a lot of people were doing, especially in the U.S., around that time: wondering how the seismic shake-up of everything just a month prior would detour things going forward.

For this chat, she and I were thinking about the industry in which we worked. She asked me how I thought the shift would disrupt things like product development. This part I can’t forget. It was a late, dark and overcast afternoon. She had an actual office (not a cubicle) with full-pane windows facing out to a major highway just beyond the office buildings. She was sitting at her desk, in front of her iMac. I happened to have my red Handspring Visor Edge with me, probably because we were discussing scheduling.

I replied that the age of organic shapes and colours we’d come to know after about 1996 was dead and over; that industrial design would get more rigid and cold; and colours would become more muted, if not absent altogether. She asked why that was. I remember saying it was because during times of crisis, people become afraid, by instinct, and are less emboldened to experiment outside of their comfort zone. I said, “Stuff like your iMac, or my Visor here, won’t look like that anymore. You’re going to see a lot more muted colours, especially bare metals and colours like grey, white, and black. People are now afraid to look toward optimism and curiosity, and this will bear out with forthcoming industrial design trends.” What I didn’t mention was this would be coincident with an adoption of design ideas borrowed from militarism and military gear. Another thing I didn’t say, but had been on my mind for at least a month, was I’d just witnessed a golden age of design die in real time.

The other thought: the companies buying Power Mac G3s and G4s around this time period were design houses, production studios, and so on, and I’d be remiss if I didn’t note how there are a lot of prima donna archetypes in that rarefied sector. More conventional companies, the kind which buy hundreds or thousands of units in a single purchase order, were outfitting offices, if using Apple, with iMacs. The niche market for a limited edition colour for the graphite G4 was there, but it likely wasn’t enough for a fledgling Apple to rationalize the costs of opening a production line for just that special-coloured case and just for that niche audience who more than had the money to pay for “different” and “exclusive”.

You did, however, see Apple later that same year, dabble in this idea for a lower risk version of this exclusive product strategy: the key lime iBook G3, to its online-only buyers who were willing to pay for it.
Up until February 2019 all the work I've ever done has been ad design and layout for newspapers, particularly weeklies. Other than my first job in this niche business, all of them have been small business (less than 20 employees). My first job was at the Desert Sun in Palm Springs, which is owned by Gannett. When they upgraded, they upgraded wholesale. Production was upgraded to G3s, but the satellite office I transferred to got G4s. You got what they were buying.

I know of the prima donnas you speak of though, you encounter them in my business too. Especially those who work for the customer who is advertising in your newspaper. They know everything - except how to build an ad to correct production specs and supply a proper PDF. I dealt with one designer who as the owner of a graphic design business couldn't understand what I was telling him about getting me a PDF from Photoshop with fonts as vectors. Fortunately, he had a junior designer who knew and was able to finally get it through his head. His attitude changed. :D

Then there are the guys who've been doing this forever, but have no degree. Not that you need one (I have an AA degree myself, not a bachelors) but because they've been there forever people defer to them. They're right most of the time, but you have to wonder at their methods and personal habits. Dan, was the guy at the Desert Sun and I learned from him that you always duplicate any layer in Photoshop you intend to apply an effect to so you have an original copy to fall back on. Of course, that's back when filters were destructive, not so much now. He also taught me 'Never use an effect just to use it.' It should have a purpose, and if you've done it right, all one should ever notice is the bit of information you were trying to make stand out by using the effect.

But the man's coffee cup…Oh My GOD! I don't think I ever saw him wash it and it was the same mug the day I was hired and the day I left. 🤷‍♂️
 

metapunk2077fail

macrumors 6502a
Oct 31, 2021
569
698
View attachment 1941787

I was wondering, what would powermacs look like in other flavors? I decided to create this preview.

I think it was complete stupidity to assume that the home market would only want all in ones. PowerMacs for the home audience would have been really cool, maybe it could even have boosted the "gamer" issue, as they were more powerful and versatile.

That's nice. The Power Mac G4 (all of the versions) were the pinnacle of desktop tower designs. I hope Apple Silicon Mac towers have such easy internal access and character.
 
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metapunk2077fail

macrumors 6502a
Oct 31, 2021
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The $1299 G4 was in my opinion the mythical "xMac" that people talk about. It was fairly cheap, and expandable. I loved mine 🙂 (it was, of course, only available in silver).

Mine was $2200 with dual processors and a basic ATI Rage 128. Inflation adjusted that's about $4000.
 

B S Magnet

macrumors 68000
Dec 5, 2018
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Up until February 2019 all the work I've ever done has been ad design and layout for newspapers, particularly weeklies. Other than my first job in this niche business, all of them have been small business (less than 20 employees). My first job was at the Desert Sun in Palm Springs, which is owned by Gannett. When they upgraded, they upgraded wholesale. Production was upgraded to G3s, but the satellite office I transferred to got G4s. You got what they were buying.

Back in ’98, I did a short stint as an advertising art director at a regional bi-weekly magazine. My production Mac there was a PowerComputing 604 clone. The editorial art director, who got paid more, got the Apple-branded Mac (which I thing was a beige G3 or else something like a 9600).

I know of the prima donnas you speak of though, you encounter them in my business too. Especially those who work for the customer who is advertising in your newspaper. They know everything - except how to build an ad to correct production specs and supply a proper PDF. I dealt with one designer who as the owner of a graphic design business couldn't understand what I was telling him about getting me a PDF from Photoshop with fonts as vectors. Fortunately, he had a junior designer who knew and was able to finally get it through his head. His attitude changed. :D

Yup. Sounds about par for the course.

Then there are the guys who've been doing this forever, but have no degree.

My entire career in marketing communications and technical design/writing all happened before I made a decision to go to post-secondary school and finish with some kind of degree.

One of the most infuriating reasons why I got brought in so many places as a contractor and not as a perm hire was because I “lacked the papers” — and yet, I’d walk into places, bringing in twice the applied experience, working twice as long, and working at least thrice the pace od the university/college-accredited perm hires, but I was only getting paid, at best, a third of what they were. Of course, I knew part of the pay penalty was due of structures and biases therefrom which were well beyond my control, but a sizeable chunk was that “no papers” quagmire.

Then I burnt out on the career. I burnt out really hard.

Not that you need one (I have an AA degree myself, not a bachelors) but because they've been there forever people defer to them. They're right most of the time, but you have to wonder at their methods and personal habits. Dan, was the guy at the Desert Sun and I learned from him that you always duplicate any layer in Photoshop you intend to apply an effect to so you have an original copy to fall back on.

Yeah, that lesson was one I had to figure out the hard way. “Trial by fire” and all that.


Of course, that's back when filters were destructive, not so much now. He also taught me 'Never use an effect just to use it.'

That was sage, brilliant advice.


It should have a purpose, and if you've done it right, all one should ever notice is the bit of information you were trying to make stand out by using the effect.

Same principle with, of all things, faces and makeup. (Ask your wife/sister/daughter/mum!) :)


But the man's coffee cup…Oh My GOD! I don't think I ever saw him wash it and it was the same mug the day I was hired and the day I left. 🤷‍♂️

Ah yes, the caffeinated battle scars.

Dried coffee residue is probably too toxic for airborne pathogens to do much of anything, but I’ve known plenty a software developer — like the ones who were creating and writing code before the market was there, before they left grade school, but who never went to post-secondary school for it — who had their go-to mug with layers of dried coffee stains which were never going to go away. Some of them eventually just got black ceramic mugs to avoid co-worker ribbing. I mean, if it got their job done, who were we to judge?
 
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